The Big Clean Up

 

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January on a smallholding?  Not much going on?…Busier than you might think!

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At the end of each growing season we cover the kitchen garden with heavy duty, reusable weedstop to kill all left over plant life to mulch into the soil the next year. Can be used on raised beds too. No need to worry about weeding throughout the winter.

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winter-washed-away

Ways to clean a polytunnel

  • Chemical Sprays – haven’t found any that really work
  • Flossing – large wet sheet with tennis balls tied to the corners and string. Throw sheet over the top and pull from side to side.
  • NotJustPots’ Quick & Easy Way – hosepipe & and extendable window washing pole with 2 non-abrasive kitchen sponge pads attached to the end with cable ties. Dampen the cover inside and out, scrub away the dirt and grime with the pads and then rinse down with the hosepipe.

Pros & Cons

  • Flossing needs 2 people, we didn’t find it very easy to do, but it will definitely reach the apex on the outside of the tunnel. It won’t work on the inside.
  • NotJustPots’ method – Easy for 1 person to do, but there’s the possibility of not reaching the apex outside. Can be used on the inside too.

garlic

garlic art

Store Cupboard Essentials – A New Direction…

lead2I know we’ve only done one of these, but I’ve been thinking…

The idea behind this feature, is to reclaim these overly processed food items and make them more natural, as they once were, when family recipes were passed down from mother to child. This probably doesn’t happen a lot these days as it is so much easier just to pick these items up at the store.

I never got a copy of my mother’s chutney recipe and when I wanted to recreate it last year, searching the web turned up numerous recipes, all with variations and interesting takes on new ingredient combinations. All I wanted was a simple old English chutney recipe, but I didn’t know where to start!

_NJP0889What’s a traditional English green tomato chutney?

Then I came across a book by Elizabeth David, widely considered to be one of Britain’s greatest food writers, called Spices, Salt & Aromatics in the English Kitchen, in which she states that historically our country has shown a “preoccupation with the spices and the scents, the fruit, the flavourings, the sauces and condiments of the orient, near and far.”

Elizabeth David 1970

During the period of the British East India Company the housewives of the time were very interested in reproducing the chutneys brought back from India, but with using ingredients they could buy at home.

This was it! My starting point…

Mild Green Tomato Chutney (recipe courtesy of Elizabeth David)
907g Green Tomatoes
907g Cooking Apples
226g Onions
680g Brown Sugar
453g Stoneless Raisins / Sultanas
2 tsp Ground Ginger
2 tsp Ground Allspice
2 tsp Crushed Black Peppercorns
2 Garlic Cloves
2 tbs Salt
852ml White Wine Vinegar

Peel and slice the onions and apples and chop the tomatoes.
Place those ingredients into a non-reactive saucepan along with all the other dry ingredients and the crushed garlic.
David then goes on to say to “moisten with a little of the vinegar
Cook gently for about 1 hour adding the vinegar as the chutney thickens.
When it reaches a jam like consistency the chutney is ready to bottle(follow your canning manufacturer’s guidelines).

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The result?

  • Using all the vinegar meant cooking for longer than 1 hour to reach the right consistency making the ingredients too soft.
  • A little too sweet and salty
  • Ratio of sultanas to apple / tomato combo too high?
  • General flavour was good, as I was hoping for a “Branston Pickle” type of chutney

Next steps…

From this solid foundation I can now, next season work on developing my own recipe that I can pass on to others…

If you’ve made this – what were your thoughts?

green tomato chutney