Tech Food

leadThe latest issue of Wired USA has just dropped through the letterbox, and in it is an article called “Invasion of the Kitchen Robots” There appears to be a number of commercial robots out there serving us food.

There is “Gordon” the robotic barista arm making coffee in San Francisco, “Sally” the salad server, twin robots making fresh ramen in China and some guys at MIT have created a fully automated mini kitchen!

Now we do like our gadgets at NotJustPots! Especially in the kitchen! Anything to make life easier…

It’s not the first time food related articles have appeared in Wired.

Back in the August 2016 edition there was a food feature called What to Eat Today. A scientific guide to eating in the modern world. Food is a struggle how do we “eat pleasurably, ethically, healthily.* I loved their periodic table for protein and couldn’t resist the cover! I just had to make that Fried Chicken!_NJP1933

The original chicken recipe was by David Chang of Momofuku, but I found this recipe at Gentrified Chicken. 

Spice mix
This makes a lot, so scale accordingly.

25 g Szechuan Peppercorns
25 g Cayenne
20 g Onion Powder
20 g Garlic Powder
25 g Paprika
10 g Thyme Powder
Grind up the Szechuan peppercorns to a fine powder, then pass through a sieve to remove chunks. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.

To make homemade thyme powder just put some dried thyme in a coffee / spice grinder.

For the Chicken
4x Chicken Thighs
4x Chicken Drumsticks
Milk
1 tsp Salt per Cup of Milk
2 Cloves Garlic
2 Sprigs Thyme
1 Bay Leaf
2 Cracks of Black Pepper
Place chicken in a large pot and cover with milk.
Add the salt and remaining ingredients and simmer at 65° C for 35 to 40 minutes, or until chicken is almost fully cooked.
Do not let the milk boil.
When done remove chicken from the liquid and cool the liquid to use in the dredging process.

Dredging and Frying
150g Plain Flour
20 g Spice Mix
Oil
Heat oil to 180° C.
Combine flour & spice mix and mix thoroughly.
Dip the chicken in the dredge, then in the cooking liquid, then back in the dredge, then in the cooking liquid, and once more in the dredge.
Fry for 3 to 5 minutes.

I’ve omitted a few things, out of personal preference,  but the unadulterated recipe can be found here:

http://gentrifriedchicken.tumblr.com/post/102237158752/david-chang-fried-chicken-vogue-caviar-recipe

I’ve made this a few times as a weekend treat, and it’s worked out really well. The chicken is super crispy!

Last night I cooked the chicken drumsticks in the sous vide, in attempt to use less milk. The chicken was tender, but the coating didn’t seem to stick as well this time.

Not sure if it’s the cooking method or the new chicken pieces, that we source from a Welsh, organic family run farm. The chicken is additive free, so maybe that affects the skin?

I’m going to do it again with the new chicken but cook it as per the recipe, and see if that makes a difference. Or maybe, a gadget is not necessarily the best tool for this job.

*Scott Dadich Editor in Chief Wired USA August 2016

IMG_0962

Po’Butty… A Welsh Twist on a Classic!

new leadFirst frosty mornings of the year have arrived and ’tis the season for comfort food – A hot pulled meat sandwich smothered in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce.

What’s in a name?

Po’ Boy – A traditional hot sandwich from Louisiana of either fried seafood or shredded meat in a sloppy sauce served on a long crusty bread roll.

Butty – A slang word for a sandwich in parts of the UK, again the contents are hot and they are placed between 2 slices of bread. Most commonly a chip butty (i.e French fries / frites) or bacon butty.
It is also a South Wales Valley phrase for a friend or mate!

The origin of the Po’Boy started “In 1922, brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin quit their jobs as New Orleans streetcar conductors and opened a coffee shop in the city’s historic French Market ….”
when in 1929 there was a major strike and the community came out in support of the strikers and “as former streetcar conductors, the brothers also lent their support, announcing that they would feed any hungry striker who could not afford to pay.”

(cited from a post by Susan Waggoner August 2015 on www.ForknPlate.com)

The South Wales Valleys are tight-knit communities with an industrial heritage that have _NJP1774also seen their fair share of strikes, so the word butty seemed a good one to use to describe this dish.

The meat traditionally used in a Po’ boy is usually a tough cut of beef slow cooked until it falls off the bone and is easily shredded. Wales is renowned for it’s lamb, but the delicate flavour of this meat, I didn’t think would work well in a Po’ Boy type sandwich, so I decided on Mutton – meat from a 3 year old sheep that is known to be a lot tougher.

And so the Mutton Po’ Butty with a Cherry & Fig BBQ Saucewas born.

I cooked the mutton in a sous vide for 3 days at 60 degrees centigrade (140 Fahrenheit).

_NJP1782Building Blocks for the BBQ Sauce

Fresh Cherry Juice
Fresh Fig Juice
Port
Sprig of Rosemary
Dark Muscovado Sugar
White Vinegar
A Dash of Welsh Wildflower Honey
NJP (NotJustPots) Tomato Ketchup**
Chilli Powder to taste.

Take the first 4 ingredients and simmer until reduced by about half. In another pan simmer the remaining ingredients until reduced by the same amount.
Combine both together.
I added a final step of simmering to thicken, as I wanted quite a thick BBQ sauce to toss the mutton in.
Serve on a homemade brioche bun.

BTW we live close to a really good authentic smoke house called The Hang Fire Southern Kitchen in Barry, South Wales, where the provenance of their food is really important to them. Check out their story here  https://hangfiresmokehouse.com/about-us/ – and if you ever get a chance to visit they make an awesome Shrimp Po’Boy!

*BBQ sauce adapted from http://www.finecooking.com/recipe/smoked-lamb-ribs-with-rosemary-and-fig-barbecue-sauce

**Recipe to follow in Store Cupboard Essentials

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Back to School Blues!

leadSeptember in the UK is the start of the new school year, and it was no exception for me! I signed up for a horticultural course.

I’ve been called the ‘Pessimistic Gardener’ as I often feel I’ve killed a few plants and that they will never grow. Nature usually always proves me wrong, but this year’s harvest has been a little hit and miss.

Zucchini (aka courgette) and other types of summer squash usually guarantees a glut and the inevitable discovery of the odd giant plant lurking beneath the leaves. But not this year!

Why?

The weather? – Spring & summer have been better than last year and we had loads then.

Depleted Soil Nutrients? – It’s not because we haven’t done crop rotation as they were planted in new raised beds that we only filled with new compost and topsoil at the beginning of the season.

Lack of water? – We installed automated irrigation this year (more details in a future post on this project).

I’ve been following other foodie blogs from around the UK and they’ve had bumper crops of courgettes! So I’m at a total loss.

The Answer?

Learn a little more about horticulture?

The course is a foundation course in the basics of horticulture, but has modules covering:

  • outdoor food production,
  • protected cultivation (greenhouses and polytunnels),
  • plant nutrition and health problems.

I thought if I’m really serious in growing all our vegetables then I might need all the help I can get.

Last week we looked at plant families and plant identification.

One family in particular is The “Mints” or Lamiacea. From the name you could determine that peppermint and spearmint and English mint are part of this family.

I was totally surprised to learn that Lavender (Lavandula) Sage, and Rosemary (Rosmarinus) are all part of the same family!

They are characterised by having 4 sided stems, something I had never noticed until I picked a few sprigs for these photographs! It’s now so obvious!

They also have whorled leaves, in that the leaves radiate around a single point. The leaves when rubbed or crushed are scented.

So…If they are related in the plant kingdom – what about flavour pairings in cooking?

Time to consult the Flavour Thesaurus and start some culinary experiments.thesarus

The Colours of My Garden

kodakThis week has kept us both busy at The Other Jobs (TOJ) and I’ve spent a good deal of time printing.

September has arrived and the kitchen garden is starting to look a little dishevelled. There are a few stragglers left to harvest and we continue to pick tomatoes, herbs and lettuce from the hydroponic tunnel.

The TOJ in question is running my small fine art printing company. It’s interesting work that requires accurate colour reproduction and to do this you need the help from some tools of the trade, like a spectrophotometer / colorimeter  – a device, that simply put, measures colour values and assigns it a numerical value depending upon the colour space you are using. I work with the colour space Red  Green  Blue

So for example white would have the following values:
R 255
G 255
B 255
And black would be
R 0
G 0
B 0

I mainly use the spectrophotometer to calibrate my camera, monitors & printers so that they speak the same colour language to make sure I get consistent colour reproduction from image capture of the original painting to the final print. However my current device also allows me to read spot colours and produce customised colour palettes.

Whilst on a tea break I read an article by Joshua Johnson at DesignShack.net about the colour pallets of 10 famous paintings, including Van Gough’s Starry Starry Night – I just love that painting!

I was inspired! What fun and a colour geek thing to do  – use our fruit and veg  to make my own colour palette.

So here’s the start of my garden colour range.

colour pallet

* Mucho Miel is an Italian Salad Tomato

Check out the article if you’re interested, he talks about Dali, De Vincci and Norman Rockwell among others

https://designshack.net/articles/inspiration/10-free-color-palettes-from-10-famous-paintings/