The week that’s been – About mushrooms

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We’ve got 2 other windowsill kits, as well as the Shiitakes – Grey & Yellow Oyster Mushrooms. Despite having yellow gills, these are actually the grey ones. They are growing nicely. The yellow ones I was just about to give up on, but this morning I can see small mushrooms on the growing medium.

mushroomIt’s been a busy week with course assignment deadlines and winter colds. Just found enough time to photograph these weird and wonderful objects, before we pick them and eat then for dinner!

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The week that’s been – Cold!

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Heavy frosts have continued, so with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and a kettle of hot water in the other it’s off to the chicken pen to make sure they have free flowing water.

cider vinergar

Planting in the polytunnel has started. I start my broad beans off in pots, so that the field mice don’e eat them all!

broadbean

An ethical alternative to avocado? Less air-miles? And to be honest, it’s hard to find a decent avocado in a UK supermarket.

guacamole recipe

guagamole

What’s New?

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As you may have noticed, the blog has taken on a new look. 

This is a blog for self sufficiency in the modern world, we all have other jobs, busy lives, and I’ve noticed at NotJustPots often the week is filled with lots of little, little & maybe insignificant things, telling small stories. It’s not a time to wax lyrical about living a self sufficient life in the ideal sense of the word, and portraying a dream of living off the land… That can’t always be possible for whatever reasons. We’re still learning about this and still working out what’s possible with what we’ve got.  Hopefully you can work out what you can do about where your food comes from with what you’ve got.

Sounds like an about us page? Well as we said there – if you follow a couple of tech hippies on their journey you would see that we throw convention to the wind sometimes… Guess we just did.

Anyway welcome to ‘the week that’s been’ storyboard at NotJustpots (NJP)

seeds arriving

shitake

Now this is a first for us, growing mushrooms. You can order these self contained kits with full growing instructions online.

The shiitake mushroom spores are seeded on a sawdust log in a plastic tray, so there’s no mess. When we received ours last week, the log had small white and brown bumps on it, so all we needed to do was place them on a north facing window sill in a room that was a minimum of 15 deg C and spray daily to keep the sawdust moist.  In just under a week mushrooms are sprouting and growing daily!

So this is the stage we’re at now with our shiitake mushrooms. In few weeks they should be ready to harvest.

  • Grow all year round
  • Easy to grow!

 

funtime

 

We’ve always let our aeroponic herbs run riot, and it gets hard to clear down the system at the end of a growing cycle. So this year, we’re going to harvest a whole, smaller plant at a time and cover the growing hole with a home designed plug to prevent the formation of algae.

Never designed something with CAD software before, took 3 prototypes to get these plugs right, then printed them on our small 3D printer (a nice and useful thing to have on a smallholding I’ve printed replacement wheel bushes for our old faithful wheelbarrows in the past, but never designed something from scratch!!)

And finally some studio time. Looking forward to using the ‘franken cam’ to capture the plants, ingredients & stories that grow from NJP!  – Have a good week!

Po’Butty… A Welsh Twist on a Classic!

new leadFirst frosty mornings of the year have arrived and ’tis the season for comfort food – A hot pulled meat sandwich smothered in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce.

What’s in a name?

Po’ Boy – A traditional hot sandwich from Louisiana of either fried seafood or shredded meat in a sloppy sauce served on a long crusty bread roll.

Butty – A slang word for a sandwich in parts of the UK, again the contents are hot and they are placed between 2 slices of bread. Most commonly a chip butty (i.e French fries / frites) or bacon butty.
It is also a South Wales Valley phrase for a friend or mate!

The origin of the Po’Boy started “In 1922, brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin quit their jobs as New Orleans streetcar conductors and opened a coffee shop in the city’s historic French Market ….”
when in 1929 there was a major strike and the community came out in support of the strikers and “as former streetcar conductors, the brothers also lent their support, announcing that they would feed any hungry striker who could not afford to pay.”

(cited from a post by Susan Waggoner August 2015 on www.ForknPlate.com)

The South Wales Valleys are tight-knit communities with an industrial heritage that have _NJP1774also seen their fair share of strikes, so the word butty seemed a good one to use to describe this dish.

The meat traditionally used in a Po’ boy is usually a tough cut of beef slow cooked until it falls off the bone and is easily shredded. Wales is renowned for it’s lamb, but the delicate flavour of this meat, I didn’t think would work well in a Po’ Boy type sandwich, so I decided on Mutton – meat from a 3 year old sheep that is known to be a lot tougher.

And so the Mutton Po’ Butty with a Cherry & Fig BBQ Saucewas born.

I cooked the mutton in a sous vide for 3 days at 60 degrees centigrade (140 Fahrenheit).

_NJP1782Building Blocks for the BBQ Sauce

Fresh Cherry Juice
Fresh Fig Juice
Port
Sprig of Rosemary
Dark Muscovado Sugar
White Vinegar
A Dash of Welsh Wildflower Honey
NJP (NotJustPots) Tomato Ketchup**
Chilli Powder to taste.

Take the first 4 ingredients and simmer until reduced by about half. In another pan simmer the remaining ingredients until reduced by the same amount.
Combine both together.
I added a final step of simmering to thicken, as I wanted quite a thick BBQ sauce to toss the mutton in.
Serve on a homemade brioche bun.

BTW we live close to a really good authentic smoke house called The Hang Fire Southern Kitchen in Barry, South Wales, where the provenance of their food is really important to them. Check out their story here  https://hangfiresmokehouse.com/about-us/ – and if you ever get a chance to visit they make an awesome Shrimp Po’Boy!

*BBQ sauce adapted from http://www.finecooking.com/recipe/smoked-lamb-ribs-with-rosemary-and-fig-barbecue-sauce

**Recipe to follow in Store Cupboard Essentials

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Caramel Carrots

headerIn an earlier post we talked about the resurgence of the pressure cooker. If like us you decided to invest in one of these kitchen bad boys, then you need to make the most of it. It’s not just about soups and stews.

I must be honest, I need inspiration when it comes to creating vegetable dishes. I grew up with either boiled, baked, steamed and mashed vegetables served as a side to the main event.  That’s not a problem if dinner is a good steak with chips and peas or even pizza and a crisp green salad!

However with a garden full of fresh vegetables I need to find ways of making vegetables more appealing and giving them the limelight.

Whilst researching the other article I came across this YouTube clip about caramelised carrot soup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nT_EFG1oiL8

Carrots are in season in the garden so we tried this out – only as far as cooking the carrots, but didn’t see the recipe through to the soup stage.

Our Recipe In Short

500g Carrots Washed and Chopped in 5cm / 2” pieces
113g Unsalted Butter Cut up into chunks
2.5g Bicarbonate of Soda (aka Baking Soda)
30g Water

  1. Place butter into the pressure cooker and then add the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Seal and bring temperature to 1 bar (15psi) and cook for 20 minutes.
  3. Time the cooking from when the correct pressure is reached.
  4. We use a stove top pressure cooker with side grips so we shook the pan gently a few times to stop the carrots from sticking.
  5. Once cooked reduce the pressure by running the rim under tepid water. Please refer to the manufacturers’ Safety Guidelines for depressurising a pressure cooker

The Result

Soft (but not soggy) rich naturally sweet caramelised carrots

The Reason

Cooking in a pressure cooker produces a Maillard Reaction (commonly known as browning)

The Bicarbonate of Soda produces an alkaline environment which aids caramelisation at lower temperatures adding to the flavour and helps the carrots caramelise all the way through and not just on the surface.

Looks like we can use this for other root veg and hard crops such as squash. Can’t wait for the winter squash harvest!

Here’s a link to the full soup recipe.
http://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/at-home-caramelized-carrot-soup/

A handy and comprehensive review of pressure cookers on the market can be found here. http://wonderstreet.com/reviews/the-best-pressure-cookers
We use the Kuhn Rikon Duromatic with side grips (not listed), which we’ve had no problems with so far.

Please note we are not affiliated or endorsed by any of these companies or publications. All opinions and comments are our own._NJP0936

Not Your Mother’s (Gran’s?) Pressure Cooker

leadimageLet’s get over this first: They’re safe to use.

The days of fear that gripped households as they cooked with these unexploded aluminium bombs in the 50’s, that if misused or badly built, would eject the contents of the pan skywards (at best) are gone! They went on the scrapheap for decades but they deserve a comeback because they really create an amazing cooking environment.

Many contemporary chefs are turning once again to the pressure cooker to create some awesome food. In this YouTube clip, several chefs expound the virtue of this way of cooking.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4nOIRoe6mU

And in Modernist Cuisine, The Art & Science of Cooking, an encyclopaedia to the science of modern cooking, (Sticker Shock Alert! OMG! Christmas list for a rich aunt?…) one of the authors, Nathan Myhrvold believes pressure cookers are the must have kitchen tool for making stocks.herbs

The reason?

Pressure cooking, is moist cooking.
The temperature at which water boils rises when pressure increases. When the pressure cooker gauge is showing 1 red ring, the boiling point of the water can be around 120 degrees centigrade. Water will not boil inside a pressure cooker because the pot is sealed. As water vapour vaporises inside, it raises the ambient pressure  which in turn increases the boiling point. As long as the pressure cooker is sealed and no water vapour is escaping, the pressure inside will stay high enough to stop the water from boiling.

The Result?

The flavours and aromas of the food are all sweated out of the ingredients and as the liquid vaporises on the lid the moisture and flavour is retained in the sealed pan. Also cooking food at high temperatures can produce a Maillard Reaction, this is what happens when food is browned and caramelised, infusing a greater depth of flavour in the food.

Pressure cooking is also fast, it cooks in less time than most conventional methods of cooking.

Enough of the science stuff here’s something fun to do with a pressure cooker.

Not got the time to cook a whole roast chicken? Bung it in a pressure cooker! IMG_4812Really? Yes Really!
It comes out so juicy and tender and falls off the bone.
All within 25 minutes.

I was using the chicken to make a chicken chili verde, so I used the following poaching ingredients:

  • Fresh Tarragon
  • Fresh Thyme
  • A couple of Bay Leaves
  • 10 Szechuan Peppercorns
  • Half a red onion
  • A Carrot roughly chopped

Put the cooking rack in the bottom of the pan and add 2 cups of water (or whatever the manufacturer recommends)
Put the chicken in the pot breast side upIMG_4748
Seal the pressure cooker and bring up to high pressure – for my cooker that means I see 2 red rings on the gauge.
Once it’s reached pressure cook for 25 minutes.
Don’t forget leave the lid on for the pressure to drop naturally and so all the vapours drop back into the pan and use the liquid at the bottom as stock.

I used mine in the chili verde that I served with red rice and broad bean guacamole.

There was even chicken left over for the next day. Enchiladas anyone?

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