The week that’s been – Cold!

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Heavy frosts have continued, so with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and a kettle of hot water in the other it’s off to the chicken pen to make sure they have free flowing water.

cider vinergar

Planting in the polytunnel has started. I start my broad beans off in pots, so that the field mice don’e eat them all!

broadbean

An ethical alternative to avocado? Less air-miles? And to be honest, it’s hard to find a decent avocado in a UK supermarket.

guacamole recipe

guagamole

Store Cupboard Essentials – A New Direction…

lead2I know we’ve only done one of these, but I’ve been thinking…

The idea behind this feature, is to reclaim these overly processed food items and make them more natural, as they once were, when family recipes were passed down from mother to child. This probably doesn’t happen a lot these days as it is so much easier just to pick these items up at the store.

I never got a copy of my mother’s chutney recipe and when I wanted to recreate it last year, searching the web turned up numerous recipes, all with variations and interesting takes on new ingredient combinations. All I wanted was a simple old English chutney recipe, but I didn’t know where to start!

_NJP0889What’s a traditional English green tomato chutney?

Then I came across a book by Elizabeth David, widely considered to be one of Britain’s greatest food writers, called Spices, Salt & Aromatics in the English Kitchen, in which she states that historically our country has shown a “preoccupation with the spices and the scents, the fruit, the flavourings, the sauces and condiments of the orient, near and far.”

Elizabeth David 1970

During the period of the British East India Company the housewives of the time were very interested in reproducing the chutneys brought back from India, but with using ingredients they could buy at home.

This was it! My starting point…

Mild Green Tomato Chutney (recipe courtesy of Elizabeth David)
907g Green Tomatoes
907g Cooking Apples
226g Onions
680g Brown Sugar
453g Stoneless Raisins / Sultanas
2 tsp Ground Ginger
2 tsp Ground Allspice
2 tsp Crushed Black Peppercorns
2 Garlic Cloves
2 tbs Salt
852ml White Wine Vinegar

Peel and slice the onions and apples and chop the tomatoes.
Place those ingredients into a non-reactive saucepan along with all the other dry ingredients and the crushed garlic.
David then goes on to say to “moisten with a little of the vinegar
Cook gently for about 1 hour adding the vinegar as the chutney thickens.
When it reaches a jam like consistency the chutney is ready to bottle(follow your canning manufacturer’s guidelines).

_BYS0025

The result?

  • Using all the vinegar meant cooking for longer than 1 hour to reach the right consistency making the ingredients too soft.
  • A little too sweet and salty
  • Ratio of sultanas to apple / tomato combo too high?
  • General flavour was good, as I was hoping for a “Branston Pickle” type of chutney

Next steps…

From this solid foundation I can now, next season work on developing my own recipe that I can pass on to others…

If you’ve made this – what were your thoughts?

green tomato chutney

Po’Butty… A Welsh Twist on a Classic!

new leadFirst frosty mornings of the year have arrived and ’tis the season for comfort food – A hot pulled meat sandwich smothered in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce.

What’s in a name?

Po’ Boy – A traditional hot sandwich from Louisiana of either fried seafood or shredded meat in a sloppy sauce served on a long crusty bread roll.

Butty – A slang word for a sandwich in parts of the UK, again the contents are hot and they are placed between 2 slices of bread. Most commonly a chip butty (i.e French fries / frites) or bacon butty.
It is also a South Wales Valley phrase for a friend or mate!

The origin of the Po’Boy started “In 1922, brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin quit their jobs as New Orleans streetcar conductors and opened a coffee shop in the city’s historic French Market ….”
when in 1929 there was a major strike and the community came out in support of the strikers and “as former streetcar conductors, the brothers also lent their support, announcing that they would feed any hungry striker who could not afford to pay.”

(cited from a post by Susan Waggoner August 2015 on www.ForknPlate.com)

The South Wales Valleys are tight-knit communities with an industrial heritage that have _NJP1774also seen their fair share of strikes, so the word butty seemed a good one to use to describe this dish.

The meat traditionally used in a Po’ boy is usually a tough cut of beef slow cooked until it falls off the bone and is easily shredded. Wales is renowned for it’s lamb, but the delicate flavour of this meat, I didn’t think would work well in a Po’ Boy type sandwich, so I decided on Mutton – meat from a 3 year old sheep that is known to be a lot tougher.

And so the Mutton Po’ Butty with a Cherry & Fig BBQ Saucewas born.

I cooked the mutton in a sous vide for 3 days at 60 degrees centigrade (140 Fahrenheit).

_NJP1782Building Blocks for the BBQ Sauce

Fresh Cherry Juice
Fresh Fig Juice
Port
Sprig of Rosemary
Dark Muscovado Sugar
White Vinegar
A Dash of Welsh Wildflower Honey
NJP (NotJustPots) Tomato Ketchup**
Chilli Powder to taste.

Take the first 4 ingredients and simmer until reduced by about half. In another pan simmer the remaining ingredients until reduced by the same amount.
Combine both together.
I added a final step of simmering to thicken, as I wanted quite a thick BBQ sauce to toss the mutton in.
Serve on a homemade brioche bun.

BTW we live close to a really good authentic smoke house called The Hang Fire Southern Kitchen in Barry, South Wales, where the provenance of their food is really important to them. Check out their story here  https://hangfiresmokehouse.com/about-us/ – and if you ever get a chance to visit they make an awesome Shrimp Po’Boy!

*BBQ sauce adapted from http://www.finecooking.com/recipe/smoked-lamb-ribs-with-rosemary-and-fig-barbecue-sauce

**Recipe to follow in Store Cupboard Essentials

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Store Cupboard Staples from Scratch

storecupboardThought we’d start putting some store cupboard recipes up – we’ll try to do this once a month. We got a Weck home canner a couple of months ago after agonising about the safe and scary ways to preserve things long term. The Weck system seemed the best to us from a food safety point of view and ended the inevitable cracked Kilner jars when boiling them on the stove top. Anyway it allowed us to start changing our store cupboard from shop bought condiments / sauces and other preserves to things we make ourselves. We’ll do Brown Sauce this month and coming up will be Tomato Ketchup, Mango Chutney, Burger Relish and Jam plus whatever else we can think of.

Some of the recipes we make are a way of using up the harvest from the garden, and a way of preserving food for later in the season. Others may be just nice stuff – treats, and creating our own version of condiments to try and limit our consumption of artificial preservatives, high levels of sugar and salt. We’ll try to use things from the garden seasonally though this can be difficult.

brown sauceflatr

So anyway this is Brown Sauce month! A spicy condiment almost always tomato based – famous brands such as  HP Sauce (UK / Ireland / Australia / New Zealand / Canada), A1 Steak Sauce (USA). In the UK there is also Tiptree Brown sauce but we prefer HP original’s spicier taste.

The British plum season starts late August to early October & we have 3 Brown Turkey Fig trees growing in pots bursting with fruit, so this is my take on a spicy, yet slightly fruity brown sauce.

NJP’s Brown Sauce Recipe_NJP1236

453g British Plums stones removed
283g Fresh Figs chopped roughly
185g Onion chopped roughly
65g Raisins
13g Fresh Garlic
13g Fresh Ginger
18g Fresh Red Chili Peppers deseeded

_NJP1265SPICES
1/4 tbsp Chili Powder
1/4 tbsp Turmeric
1/4 tsp Allspice Berries
A couple of Mace Blades
2 tsp Tamarind Paste

PRESERVING AGENTS
14g Salt *
187ml Cider Vinegar
70g Dark Brown Muscovado Sugar *
1 tsp Black Treacle *

  1. Place all the ingredients apart from the sugar into a nonreactive pan – don’t use copper!
  2. Bring to the boil and then place onto a low heat and simmer until the fruit is soft and pulpy.
  3. Blitz the contents of the pan in a blender / food processor
  4. At this point either return the sauce to the pan or you can use the extra step of using a food mill to extract liquid from the pulp, depending on whether you want a clearer sauce without bits.
  5. Add the sugar to the blended sauce and simmer until the desired consistency is reached *
  6. Place into sterilised jars and follow the manufacturer’s recommendation for your canning method.
  7. If not using a preserving bath, use the sauce within 2 weeks and  always keep refrigerated.

* If you want a long shelf life for your preserves you need to use preserving agents traditionally these are salt, sugar & vinegars.

  • So use unrefined cane sugar wherever possible.
  • Use black treacle where molasses is not available. I used this as a colouring for the sauce to give a rich brown colour instead of a food colouring. (I plan on looking at making natural food colourings soon, so hopefully I can drop this items from the next batch of brown sauce).
  • To check the consistency I put a sample of sauce on a cold saucer and placed it into the fridge to cool. When cool the sauce behaves differently. Desired thickness is a personal choice, but we like our brown sauce gloopy!