The Big Clean Up

 

lead

January on a smallholding?  Not much going on?…Busier than you might think!

landscape-storyboard-test

At the end of each growing season we cover the kitchen garden with heavy duty, reusable weedstop to kill all left over plant life to mulch into the soil the next year. Can be used on raised beds too. No need to worry about weeding throughout the winter.

tools-lie-idle-sb

winter-washed-away

Ways to clean a polytunnel

  • Chemical Sprays – haven’t found any that really work
  • Flossing – large wet sheet with tennis balls tied to the corners and string. Throw sheet over the top and pull from side to side.
  • NotJustPots’ Quick & Easy Way – hosepipe & and extendable window washing pole with 2 non-abrasive kitchen sponge pads attached to the end with cable ties. Dampen the cover inside and out, scrub away the dirt and grime with the pads and then rinse down with the hosepipe.

Pros & Cons

  • Flossing needs 2 people, we didn’t find it very easy to do, but it will definitely reach the apex on the outside of the tunnel. It won’t work on the inside.
  • NotJustPots’ method – Easy for 1 person to do, but there’s the possibility of not reaching the apex outside. Can be used on the inside too.

garlic

garlic art

Robot Overlords – Building a Robot to Grow our Food

leadWe’re properly excited at NotJustPots and a little concerned about our level of engineering practicality because this week the robot gardener arrived. Well not actually a robot but an automated gardening system called Farmbot.

We first came across Farmbot in 2016 as a Kickstarter campaign. Farmbot is a small scale, open source DIY agricultural robot, and when I say small scale it really is. The company is aiming the product at the home gardener. All you need is a raised bed!IMG_8761
It plants seeds, waters and weeds so you don’t have to! It’s not going to solve the worlds food issues but it’s great to learn more about food, engineering and how they interact.

It’s promoted as the next eco-friendly way to grow your own food, as it is based on precision planting and watering. Nothing is wasted and is suitable for even the busiest of households – just watch your garden grow as you control the system online. It’s a little out there – we’re early adopters and that’s a gamble that’s not always worked out.

Anyway from what we read it sounded like it might be a big helping hand, so we took a punt and are trying out an experiment.

This week we took delivery of version 1.3, so we cleared one bed located closest to the house, as it’s already got a water supply next to it and we’ve started to assemble it.IMG_8759

It comes in 2 packages and comes flat packed so there is some assembly required. Not a lot of big heavy parts, but quite a few, actually lots of small parts, including a set of tools. Yay! We finally have a his and her set of precision hex drivers!!! How tech hippy is that!

I’m the chief Ikea furniture putter together at NotJustPots, and the lengthy online assembly instructions are a little daunting.

So over the next coming weeks, we will let you know what we learn and keep you updated on our progress.

Please note we are not affiliated or endorsed by any of these companies or publications. All opinions and comments are our own.

Back to School Blues!

leadSeptember in the UK is the start of the new school year, and it was no exception for me! I signed up for a horticultural course.

I’ve been called the ‘Pessimistic Gardener’ as I often feel I’ve killed a few plants and that they will never grow. Nature usually always proves me wrong, but this year’s harvest has been a little hit and miss.

Zucchini (aka courgette) and other types of summer squash usually guarantees a glut and the inevitable discovery of the odd giant plant lurking beneath the leaves. But not this year!

Why?

The weather? – Spring & summer have been better than last year and we had loads then.

Depleted Soil Nutrients? – It’s not because we haven’t done crop rotation as they were planted in new raised beds that we only filled with new compost and topsoil at the beginning of the season.

Lack of water? – We installed automated irrigation this year (more details in a future post on this project).

I’ve been following other foodie blogs from around the UK and they’ve had bumper crops of courgettes! So I’m at a total loss.

The Answer?

Learn a little more about horticulture?

The course is a foundation course in the basics of horticulture, but has modules covering:

  • outdoor food production,
  • protected cultivation (greenhouses and polytunnels),
  • plant nutrition and health problems.

I thought if I’m really serious in growing all our vegetables then I might need all the help I can get.

Last week we looked at plant families and plant identification.

One family in particular is The “Mints” or Lamiacea. From the name you could determine that peppermint and spearmint and English mint are part of this family.

I was totally surprised to learn that Lavender (Lavandula) Sage, and Rosemary (Rosmarinus) are all part of the same family!

They are characterised by having 4 sided stems, something I had never noticed until I picked a few sprigs for these photographs! It’s now so obvious!

They also have whorled leaves, in that the leaves radiate around a single point. The leaves when rubbed or crushed are scented.

So…If they are related in the plant kingdom – what about flavour pairings in cooking?

Time to consult the Flavour Thesaurus and start some culinary experiments.thesarus

Raising The Beds

beds_leadOur ground was pretty poor in parts, a shallow covering of soil over heavy clay. Anything we planted would be fighting this so we decided on raised beds. They needed to be fairly large (they can scale to fit the space available) and I wanted them to last so it meant a trip to the local timber supplier. I found some treated 4.8m x 200mm x 45mm lengths which looked like they’d do the job. Using these 3 high, with beds 4.8m x 1.2m was the plan. I’d need some square posts for the corners and it became apparent I’d need some central support and bracing in the middle.

IMG_6335

So each bed used:

  • 7.5 x boards
  • 4.8m of 75 x 75 posts (60cm lengths in each corner and in the centre and one 1.2 to brace between the centres)
  • A lot of exterior screws
  • Weedstop in the bottom

Once finished I needed to work out roughly how much compost / topsoil to put in each bed. I wasn’t going to fill them to the very top.

Soil Calculation:
4.8m x 1.2m x 0.5m = 2.88 cubic metres.
Multiply this by 1000 gives 2880 litres of soil or compost per bed

Wow! We were going to have to buy that in bulk!
We built 3 in a polytunnel initially, _TDF4541then 2 smaller ones for herbs like sage and rosemary. Then came another 3… then came another 8… So most of our food is grown in these now. This year we’ve got:

  • Carrots
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Broad Beans
  • Jerusalem Artichoke (aka Sun Chokes)
  • Summer & Winter Squash including pumpkin and patty pan
  • Beetroot
  • Sweetcorn
  • Kohl Rabi
  • Horseradish
  • Rhubarb
  • Chard
  • Raddish
  • Tomatoes
  • Chamomile
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Chives
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Broccoli Raab
  • French Beans
  • Cucumbers and pickling cucumbers
  • Strawberries

On the one bit of good ground we’ve mainly laid that with legumes – peas, mangetout, runner and other climbing beans, sweetcorn and sunflowers. These can be grown in beds also.

Benefits of Raised Beds

  • Higher Yield – plants can be grown closer together than in the open ground
  • Minimises Weeds
  • Companion Planting of crops and flowers to minimise pests
  • Extended Growing Season – as soil temperature will be higher than open ground
  • Scaleable & Easily Adapted to suit your needs

IMG_3832