The week that’s been – About mushrooms

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We’ve got 2 other windowsill kits, as well as the Shiitakes – Grey & Yellow Oyster Mushrooms. Despite having yellow gills, these are actually the grey ones. They are growing nicely. The yellow ones I was just about to give up on, but this morning I can see small mushrooms on the growing medium.

mushroomIt’s been a busy week with course assignment deadlines and winter colds. Just found enough time to photograph these weird and wonderful objects, before we pick them and eat then for dinner!

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The week that’s been – Cold!

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Heavy frosts have continued, so with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and a kettle of hot water in the other it’s off to the chicken pen to make sure they have free flowing water.

cider vinergar

Planting in the polytunnel has started. I start my broad beans off in pots, so that the field mice don’e eat them all!

broadbean

An ethical alternative to avocado? Less air-miles? And to be honest, it’s hard to find a decent avocado in a UK supermarket.

guacamole recipe

guagamole

What’s New?

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As you may have noticed, the blog has taken on a new look. 

This is a blog for self sufficiency in the modern world, we all have other jobs, busy lives, and I’ve noticed at NotJustPots often the week is filled with lots of little, little & maybe insignificant things, telling small stories. It’s not a time to wax lyrical about living a self sufficient life in the ideal sense of the word, and portraying a dream of living off the land… That can’t always be possible for whatever reasons. We’re still learning about this and still working out what’s possible with what we’ve got.  Hopefully you can work out what you can do about where your food comes from with what you’ve got.

Sounds like an about us page? Well as we said there – if you follow a couple of tech hippies on their journey you would see that we throw convention to the wind sometimes… Guess we just did.

Anyway welcome to ‘the week that’s been’ storyboard at NotJustpots (NJP)

seeds arriving

shitake

Now this is a first for us, growing mushrooms. You can order these self contained kits with full growing instructions online.

The shiitake mushroom spores are seeded on a sawdust log in a plastic tray, so there’s no mess. When we received ours last week, the log had small white and brown bumps on it, so all we needed to do was place them on a north facing window sill in a room that was a minimum of 15 deg C and spray daily to keep the sawdust moist.  In just under a week mushrooms are sprouting and growing daily!

So this is the stage we’re at now with our shiitake mushrooms. In few weeks they should be ready to harvest.

  • Grow all year round
  • Easy to grow!

 

funtime

 

We’ve always let our aeroponic herbs run riot, and it gets hard to clear down the system at the end of a growing cycle. So this year, we’re going to harvest a whole, smaller plant at a time and cover the growing hole with a home designed plug to prevent the formation of algae.

Never designed something with CAD software before, took 3 prototypes to get these plugs right, then printed them on our small 3D printer (a nice and useful thing to have on a smallholding I’ve printed replacement wheel bushes for our old faithful wheelbarrows in the past, but never designed something from scratch!!)

And finally some studio time. Looking forward to using the ‘franken cam’ to capture the plants, ingredients & stories that grow from NJP!  – Have a good week!

Experiments Afoot

basil seedlings

The winter clean up continues as our thoughts turn to seeds.

lightexperiment

Which lighting?

LED 2 spectrum (red & blue) v Fluorescent

We’ve used fluorescent lights in the past, as they were easier to source in this country, but are quite expensive to run. 

Research shows that white light is not particularly the correct wavelength for plant growth. 

LED’s are cheaper to run but harder to find here. There are some really expensive ones, but we found some ‘cheaper’ imports.

Germination Results

Under Fluorescent – both basil and cilantro (coriander) sprouted

  • Basil leaves were larger and the plants seemed a little taller, the roots were clearly visible through the grow cube
  • Cilantro – again leaves and roots larger, but stems were straggly and pale
  • Leaves larger as seedlings were seeking out enough light to grow

Under LEDs – red / blue spectrum

  • Leaves on both plants were smaller but were darker green (richer in chlorophyl)
  • The cilantro stalks were stronger, a darker green and a little shorter
  • Failed germination at the corners of the seed tray – due to lack of light coverage or perhaps due to the quality of the LED lights. We’d like to do further experiments, on a small scale, of the far red & far blue spectrum, but germination season is almost here, so we’ll go with these panels this season.

We planted out the strongest looking seedlings into pots of earth and placed them on window sills through out the house.

Our first official full set of herbs and salad leaves are now in the propagator. We hope to have them growing on in the aeroponic tanks in a couple of weeks.

basil

The Big Clean Up

 

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January on a smallholding?  Not much going on?…Busier than you might think!

landscape-storyboard-test

At the end of each growing season we cover the kitchen garden with heavy duty, reusable weedstop to kill all left over plant life to mulch into the soil the next year. Can be used on raised beds too. No need to worry about weeding throughout the winter.

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winter-washed-away

Ways to clean a polytunnel

  • Chemical Sprays – haven’t found any that really work
  • Flossing – large wet sheet with tennis balls tied to the corners and string. Throw sheet over the top and pull from side to side.
  • NotJustPots’ Quick & Easy Way – hosepipe & and extendable window washing pole with 2 non-abrasive kitchen sponge pads attached to the end with cable ties. Dampen the cover inside and out, scrub away the dirt and grime with the pads and then rinse down with the hosepipe.

Pros & Cons

  • Flossing needs 2 people, we didn’t find it very easy to do, but it will definitely reach the apex on the outside of the tunnel. It won’t work on the inside.
  • NotJustPots’ method – Easy for 1 person to do, but there’s the possibility of not reaching the apex outside. Can be used on the inside too.

garlic

garlic art

Tech Food

leadThe latest issue of Wired USA has just dropped through the letterbox, and in it is an article called “Invasion of the Kitchen Robots” There appears to be a number of commercial robots out there serving us food.

There is “Gordon” the robotic barista arm making coffee in San Francisco, “Sally” the salad server, twin robots making fresh ramen in China and some guys at MIT have created a fully automated mini kitchen!

Now we do like our gadgets at NotJustPots! Especially in the kitchen! Anything to make life easier…

It’s not the first time food related articles have appeared in Wired.

Back in the August 2016 edition there was a food feature called What to Eat Today. A scientific guide to eating in the modern world. Food is a struggle how do we “eat pleasurably, ethically, healthily.* I loved their periodic table for protein and couldn’t resist the cover! I just had to make that Fried Chicken!_NJP1933

The original chicken recipe was by David Chang of Momofuku, but I found this recipe at Gentrified Chicken. 

Spice mix
This makes a lot, so scale accordingly.

25 g Szechuan Peppercorns
25 g Cayenne
20 g Onion Powder
20 g Garlic Powder
25 g Paprika
10 g Thyme Powder
Grind up the Szechuan peppercorns to a fine powder, then pass through a sieve to remove chunks. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.

To make homemade thyme powder just put some dried thyme in a coffee / spice grinder.

For the Chicken
4x Chicken Thighs
4x Chicken Drumsticks
Milk
1 tsp Salt per Cup of Milk
2 Cloves Garlic
2 Sprigs Thyme
1 Bay Leaf
2 Cracks of Black Pepper
Place chicken in a large pot and cover with milk.
Add the salt and remaining ingredients and simmer at 65° C for 35 to 40 minutes, or until chicken is almost fully cooked.
Do not let the milk boil.
When done remove chicken from the liquid and cool the liquid to use in the dredging process.

Dredging and Frying
150g Plain Flour
20 g Spice Mix
Oil
Heat oil to 180° C.
Combine flour & spice mix and mix thoroughly.
Dip the chicken in the dredge, then in the cooking liquid, then back in the dredge, then in the cooking liquid, and once more in the dredge.
Fry for 3 to 5 minutes.

I’ve omitted a few things, out of personal preference,  but the unadulterated recipe can be found here:

http://gentrifriedchicken.tumblr.com/post/102237158752/david-chang-fried-chicken-vogue-caviar-recipe

I’ve made this a few times as a weekend treat, and it’s worked out really well. The chicken is super crispy!

Last night I cooked the chicken drumsticks in the sous vide, in attempt to use less milk. The chicken was tender, but the coating didn’t seem to stick as well this time.

Not sure if it’s the cooking method or the new chicken pieces, that we source from a Welsh, organic family run farm. The chicken is additive free, so maybe that affects the skin?

I’m going to do it again with the new chicken but cook it as per the recipe, and see if that makes a difference. Or maybe, a gadget is not necessarily the best tool for this job.

*Scott Dadich Editor in Chief Wired USA August 2016

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“The VegiVows”

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As an avid Margaret Atwood fan I devour her novels almost as soon as I can get my grubby gardener hands on them. But what with the move to, and all the renovations at the small holding I’ve not found the time to read.

With all the major DIY projects finally behind us this year, the main growing season over and the dismal, Fifty Shades of Kodak Grey skies, hampering any robot building efforts, I finally picked up Atwood’s The Year of The Flood. An aptly titled book, since it hasn’t stopped raining?! 

In the book we’re introduced to the “Gardeners” a vegetarian eco group who take Vegivows and cultivate secret roof top gardens to grow their own food in preparation for the coming of the waterless flood that will destroy civilisation. 

Even though Atwood’s “Gardeners” were not great fans of technology, I feel hydroponic technology is a great way to produce your own food when space is limited or you do not have access to a soil garden or allotment.  You can even do it on a window sill!

How Does My Garden Grow?

Simply put, plants grow in oxygenated water containing dissolved nutrients

The plants sit in small net pots filled with clay pebbles pebbleswith their roots growing in the air. A water pump then pumps nutrient rich water through a sprinkler system that sprays the roots. Surplus water drains back into the tank to recirculate. 

Last year we grew our winter herbs and salad leaves in an enclosed aero-hydroponic system, with artificial light and heated water.
crop

However this year, we’re trying to grow them in an unheated polytunnel with just natural daylight.
I’m not sure how well this will go, as they are predicting a harsh winter because of the possibility of La Nina weather front.

On the book tour for the The Year of The Flood, Atwood said they would follow what she called the “Vegivows” – a list of things to make the tour as green as possible. One element of these vows was to eat locally produced and if possible organic food. 

I guess the reason for NotJustPots is to abide by our own set of  “VegiVows.”

  • Grow as much of our food as possible.

  • Make everything from scratch.

  • And what we can’t – Know it’s provenance. Be it sourced locally or from small independent suppliers that grow or raise their products naturally.

Here’s hoping for some dry weather, so we can crack on with the robot build!